It’s the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine

The four horsemenTry matching the quote with who said it (answers at the bottom).

  1. Most convincing as evidence of populousness, we men have actually become a burden to the earth, the fruits of nature hardly suffice to sustain us, there is a general pressure of scarcity giving rise to complaints, since the earth can no longer support us. Need we be astonished that plague and famine, warfare and earthquake come to be regarded as remedies, serving, as it were to trim and prune the superfluity of population.
    .
  2. We already have the statistics for the future: the growth percentages of pollution, overpopulation, desertification. The future is already in place.
    .
  3. The battle to feed all humanity is over. In the [decade redacted] the world will undergo famines–hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now.
    .
  4. The limits to growth on this planet will be reached sometime in the next one hundred years. The most probable result will be a rather sudden and uncontrollable decline in both population and industrial capacity.
    .
  5. Our supplies of natural resources are not finite in any economic sense. Nor does past experience give reason to expect natural resources to become more scarce. Rather, if history is any guide, natural resources will progressively become less costly, hence less scarce, and will constitute a smaller proportion of our expenses in future years.
    .
  6. The power of population is so superior to the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race.
    .
  7. It’s the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine.
    .
  8. Every generation has perceived the limits to growth that finite resources and undesirable side effects would pose if no new recipes or ideas were discovered. And every generation has underestimated the potential for finding new recipes and ideas. We consistently fail to grasp how many ideas remain to be discovered. The difficulty is the same one we have with compounding: possibilities do not merely add up; they multiply.

A. Paul Romer
.
B.  Günter Grass
.
C.  REM
.
D.  Thomas Malthus
.
E.  Tertullian, 200 CE
.
F.  Paul R. Ehrlich, 1970
.
G. Donella Meadows
.
H.  Julian Simon

.
.
.
.
1. E  2. B   3. F   4. G  5. F  6. D  7. C   8. A


 


Post to Twitter